River, Bore, Severn

This is the 169th post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared among Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week.  Here are the top articles among environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (May 18, 2020 – May 24, 2020): ✅ still fascinated by the […]

Said, Komodo, History

This is the eleventh post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared amongst Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week. Here are the top articles amongst environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (May 15 – May 21, 2017): Monday: “Canadian History Roundup – Week of […]

“Do not want hippies, motorcycles or Catholics”: The Public’s Vision for Fish Creek PP, 1974

I have written on numerous occasions, even fashioned an entire article, on the necessity for park historians to bring the voice of the general public to the forefront of park history. Giving voice to the people for whom the parks were created or to those who were directly affected by the park creation is not […]

Do Not Look Into the Manly Void: Horsbrugh, Pittsburgh, and Point State Park

Sometimes a source just clicks. Sometimes the writer just jumps from the page and one begins to feel like they know the individual personally. This is how I feel about ol’ Patrick Horsbrugh–or Patty, as I like to call him– an architect and urban planner who, in 1963, published the report, Pittsburgh Perceived: A Critical Review of […]

Park Déjà vu

Originally Published on The Otter. CHESS’s Saturday excursion into the suburban wilds originated at the Markham Museum, a Toronto suburb located north east of the city. Our visit began with a presentation by two Parks Canada employees on the new Rouge Urban National Park initiative, which will be the first Canadian national park located within an […]