Der, Die, Und

This is the 111th post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared among Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week. Here are the top articles among environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (April 8, 2019 – April 14, 2019): Sunday #WordCloud! University, Environmental, History […]

Nieuwland, Said, Environmental

This is the ninety-seventh post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared among Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week. Here are the top articles amongst environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (December 31, 2018 – January 6, 2018): https://twitter.com/fynnkaterin/status/1079514452368785408 Monday: “Do You Know Where Your Healing […]

Hwëch’in, Tr’ondëk, Klondike

This is the sixty-fourth post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared amongst Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week.   Here are the top articles amongst environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (May 14 – May 20, 2018): Sunday #Wordcloud!: Said, Water, One https://t.co/Va8SNBFgcb #envhist […]

Said, Water, One

This is the sixty-third post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared amongst Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week.   Here are the top articles amongst environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (May 7 – May 13, 2018): From our archive: Mt. St. Helen’s: Visiting […]

Environmental, Coal, People

This is the fifty-third post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared amongst Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week.   Here are the top articles amongst environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (February 26 – March 4, 2018): The reprehensible history of economic injustice and […]

Fund, Will, House

This is the twenty-ninth post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared amongst Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week. Here are the top articles amongst environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (September 11 – September 17, 2017): The First Book: Advice From Someone Barely […]

“Between Stewardship and Exploitation”: A Perspectives Piece

I am happy to announce that the issue of RCC: Perspectives, “Environmental Knowledge, Environmental Politics: Case Studies from Canada and Western Europe,” edited by Jonathan Clapperton and Liza Piper is now out. Many of the articles in this volume are products of the Carson Center and NiCHE sponsored workshop, “Environmentalism from Below,” held at University of […]

From Shippensburg to Powell and Points in Between

As I’ve climbed deeper into the depths of discipline of history, I’ve found the way that I view the world, particularly whilst travelling, has changed substantially. I’m constantly accessing the background of what lies before me, not just the surface-level imagery presented to me. In the past, I’ve often wanted to write about my travels […]

Continuing the Park System Visualization Experiment: Ontario Parks in Timeline Form

Back in February I explained how I am using interactive timelines to more easily analyze the develop of state and provincial park systems in the United States and Canada. In “Visualizing a Park System: Creating an Interactive Timeline,” I explained how I developed a label/colour system (see below) and mapped the development of Pennsylvania’s state […]

Visualizing a Park System: Creating an Interactive Timeline

One of the most challenging aspects of my dissertation is figuring out how to analyze the development of four different park systems (Pennsylvania, Idaho, Ontario, and Alberta) over a period of about one hundred years. The sources tend to blur together in my mind, making analysis nearly impossible. I am a visual learner, and about […]