Can, Trump, Tree

This is the 195th post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared among Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week.  Here are the top articles among environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (November 16, 2020 – November 22, 2020): Monday: “Knowledge, Indigenous, Google” by […]

Knowledge, Indigenous, Google

This is the 194th post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared among Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week.  Here are the top articles among environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (November 9, 2020 – November 15, 2020): Monday: “Walden Quotes – Lessons […]

The Precarity That Binds Us

This post originally appeared on the Network in Canadian History and Environment (NiCHE) as the second in a series asking how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected, or might affect, research, writing, and scholarly work in the environmental humanities. I don’t have access to a university library. I have no idea when I will be able to go […]

May, Will, Biden

This is the 166th post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared among Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week.  Here are the top articles among environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (April 27, 2020 – May 3, 2020): https://twitter.com/postcolsandwich/status/1254785402449227786 Monday: “National Archives makes […]

Said, Like, Research

This is the 149th post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared among Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week. Here are the top articles among environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (December 30, 2019 – January 5, 2020): You know, there's no such […]

People, Mercury, Can

This is the twenty-sixth post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared amongst Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week. Here are the top articles amongst environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (August 21 – August 27, 2017): Here she details how intersectionality can help […]

Google, Canadian, New

This is the sixth post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared amongst Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week. Here are the top articles amongst environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (April 10-April 16, 2017): Monday: “Is That Skeleton Gay? The Problem With Projecting […]

Visualizing a Park System: Creating an Interactive Timeline

One of the most challenging aspects of my dissertation is figuring out how to analyze the development of four different park systems (Pennsylvania, Idaho, Ontario, and Alberta) over a period of about one hundred years. The sources tend to blur together in my mind, making analysis nearly impossible. I am a visual learner, and about […]

Bittersweet Sounds of Home

One of the bittersweet parts of my dissertation research is that I’m continuously reminded of or encountering things that remind me of my childhood homeland: Northwestern Pennsylvania, namely Cook Forest State Park and the forests of the region. I stumbled on this video today. Ignoring the narrator, I closed my eyes and took in the […]

Sunshine and Frustration: Reflections on the Joys and Challenges of a Large-Scale, Transnational Dissertation

Note: This blog post originally appeared on AHA Today.    “Sorry, We’re Closed,” read the sign on the door of the small Albertan museum I had traveled hours to get to and planned to conduct research at last Monday. I sighed, “What now?” I thought to myself as I climbed back into my car … I think it is […]