“Do not want hippies, motorcycles or Catholics”: The Public’s Vision for Fish Creek PP, 1974

I have written on numerous occasions, even fashioned an entire article, on the necessity for park historians to bring the voice of the general public to the forefront of park history. Giving voice to the people for whom the parks were created or to those who were directly affected by the park creation is not …

Social Media Comments as Sources: How?

As an accidental social media guru, I’ve grown increasingly interested in how to use social media to assist with my research. Not just to connect with other academics and to propagate my opinions and ideas to the wider public, but as a source–a place from which to garner public opinion on historical topics and contemporary …

#EnvHist Worth Reading: May 2015 *The Special ‘Blogging’ Edition*

Hi all! This month instead of my typical list of five environmental history items, I hosted the History Carnival, which, essentially is a souped-up version of #envhist worth reading list, focusing on the best history blogging in town. My history carnival post can be found here. To accompany the history carnival post, Sean Kheraj and …

History Carnival: Facets of Environmental History

I hosted the June History Carnival for  the Network in Canadian History and Environment. The original post can be found here. “This month I am taking a break from our regular monthly #EnvHist Worth Reading posts to host the 146th History Carnival and focus solely on some of the best blogging that has occurred in the history community …

Environmental History Worth Reading in April 2015

Every month I choose five environmental history articles/podcasts/videos and other media that I think are worth reading. To see my full list and comments, visit the original post on the Network in Canadian History and Environment’s website. My accompanying video with Sean Kheraj is below:

Cultivating an Online Presence: Leading the Academic into the Digital Realm

Originally published on The Otter. Several months ago I wrote a piece for my department’s graduate student blog that addressed the need for Humanities students’ to expand their skill set in order adapt to the changing demands of both the academic and non-academic job markets and society at large. Sparked initially by the dialogue that took …