Women, Female, Men

This is the 129th post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared among Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week. Here are the top articles among environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (August 12, 2019 – August 18, 2019): https://t.co/MnnSBeylLa #envhist #planning #twitterstorians "However, […]

Carson, GRE, Wrote

This is the 118th post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared among Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week. Here are the top articles among environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (May 27, 2019 – June 2, 2019): Praise Song for the Unloved […]

Plastic, Horne, New

This is the twenty-first post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared amongst Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week. Here are the top articles amongst environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (July 17 – July 23, 2017): Canadian officials confirm largest earthquake caused by […]

That Ain’t Natural or Adventures in Being an Academic Killjoy I

Last night I cracked open an Images of America–a popular history series that seeks to tell lesser known aspects of American history through photographs and other images–instalment by Eugene H. Ware. The volume is dedicated to the history of Presque Isle State Park and the land on which it was created. The images themselves are fascinating, […]

Sunshine and Frustration: Reflections on the Joys and Challenges of a Large-Scale, Transnational Dissertation

Note: This blog post originally appeared on AHA Today.    “Sorry, We’re Closed,” read the sign on the door of the small Albertan museum I had traveled hours to get to and planned to conduct research at last Monday. I sighed, “What now?” I thought to myself as I climbed back into my car … I think it is […]

History Carnival: Facets of Environmental History

I hosted the June History Carnival for  the Network in Canadian History and Environment. The original post can be found here. “This month I am taking a break from our regular monthly #EnvHist Worth Reading posts to host the 146th History Carnival and focus solely on some of the best blogging that has occurred in the history community […]

On Question Periods and State Park Closures

Originally posted on Thoughts Across Time. I find the most difficult part of presenting at conferences to be the question section. There is something about being put on-the-spot that causes one to completely forget the entirety of one’s knowledge base. One frantically searches the suddenly blank depths of one’s mind for a semi-intelligent response. The ability […]

Cultivating an Online Presence: Leading the Academic into the Digital Realm

Originally published on The Otter. Several months ago I wrote a piece for my department’s graduate student blog that addressed the need for Humanities students’ to expand their skill set in order adapt to the changing demands of both the academic and non-academic job markets and society at large. Sparked initially by the dialogue that took […]

Broadening the Humanities’ Skill Set

“Broadening the Humanities’ Skill Set: The Role of GIS in Positioning the Humanities Student for Academic and Non-Academic Career Achievement” This post was originally published on Thoughts Across Time. The internet seems to be burgeoning with humanities doomsday articles lately. Questioning the sanity of humanities students, particularly of the graduate variety, these articles declare that the […]

Notes from the Field

Originally Published for Rachel Carson Center’s blog, Seeing the Woods Outsider. Insider. My academic journey thus far often seems like a tightrope act between these two desires. My background and passion for state parks and nature has led me to become an environmental historian who focuses on parks. My dissertation is a comparative history of the […]