This is the sixty-fifth post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared amongst Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week.

Here are the top articles amongst environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (May 21 – May 27, 2018):

Monday: “Exploiting Old World Forests with New World Forestry: The Canadian Forestry Corps in the First World War” by Michael O’Hagan, Network in Canadian History and Environment (NiCHE)

Tuesday: Following Pathways of Canada’s Nuclear Legacies” by Caitlynn Beckett, Network in Canadian History and Environment (NiCHE)


https://twitter.com/knski/status/999184537463808000

Wednesday: “History of Sterlite in Thoothukudi: A Story of Betrayal by Crony Regulators” by Nityanand Jayaraman, The News Minute


Thursday: Professor John L. Brooke, The Astor Lecture in Global Environmental History,” Oxford Centre for Global History


Friday: Were Native American bison hunts truly sustainable?Reddit: Ask Historians


Saturday: China Has the ‘Riskiest Environmental Project in History,’ According to a Distinguished Researcher” by André Blair, Advocator 


Sunday: Two years after the Brexit vote, Project Fear may be coming true,” The Guardian

Top Word

1. bison

2. Canadian

3. Sterlite

4. nuclear

5. plains

6. Canada

7. plant

8. Plains 

9. TNPCB

10. people

Published by Jessica M. DeWitt

Dr. Jessica M. DeWitt is an environmental historian of Canada and the United States. She is passionate about the use of digital technologies to bridge the gap between the public and researchers. In addition to her community and professional work, she offers various editing and social media consultancy services.

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