Social Media Comments as Sources: How?

As an accidental social media guru, I’ve grown increasingly interested in how to use social media to assist with my research. Not just to connect with other academics and to propagate my opinions and ideas to the wider public, but as a source–a place from which to garner public opinion on historical topics and contemporary …

#EnvHist Worth Reading: May 2015 *The Special ‘Blogging’ Edition*

Hi all! This month instead of my typical list of five environmental history items, I hosted the History Carnival, which, essentially is a souped-up version of #envhist worth reading list, focusing on the best history blogging in town. My history carnival post can be found here. To accompany the history carnival post, Sean Kheraj and …

History Carnival: Facets of Environmental History

I hosted the June History Carnival for  the Network in Canadian History and Environment. The original post can be found here. “This month I am taking a break from our regular monthly #EnvHist Worth Reading posts to host the 146th History Carnival and focus solely on some of the best blogging that has occurred in the history community …

Roundtable: Is All History Now Environmental History? The Anthropocene in Historical Context

I organized an environmental history roundtable featuring members of the Network in Canadian History and Environment (NiCHE): Stephen Bocking, Sean Kheraj, and Daniel Macfarlane. Tina Loo is acting as chair. The roundtable, “Is All History Now Environmental History? The Anthropocene in Historical Context”–a title sure to incite some debate–is being hosted by the Environmental Studies Association …

Usask Represent: University of Saskatchewan at the 2015 Canadian Historical Association Meeting

The University of Saskatchewan is a force to be reckoned with at this year’s 2015 Canadian Historical Association meeting, which is taking place June 1-3 at the University of Ottawa. I, personally, will be speaking on a roundtable on June 2nd that is cosponsored by CHA and the Environmental Studies Association of Canada, “Is All …

Do Not Look Into the Manly Void: Horsbrugh, Pittsburgh, and Point State Park

Sometimes a source just clicks. Sometimes the writer just jumps from the page and one begins to feel like they know the individual personally. This is how I feel about ol’ Patrick Horsbrugh–or Patty, as I like to call him– an architect and urban planner who, in 1963, published the report, Pittsburgh Perceived: A Critical Review of …

Billboard 5: I’m like, “Hey, what’s up? Hello.”

The status of the Hot 100 is abysmal right now. So much garbage. The queen of this garbage, Meghan Trainor with “Dear Future Husband” has risen to 18. 18? Gross. I am excited, though, that “Shut Up + Dance,” the theme song of my existence, has risen to #5. “Don’t you dare look back…” 3. …

Hagiographically-Induced Cringing: A Snippet on The Cook Family and Cook Forest State Park

I just began reading Eastern Old-Growth Forest: Prospects for Rediscovery and Recovery (1996); just began is not an overstatement, I just finished the Foreward. Nonetheless, a passage in the Foreward by John Davis demands a brief comment: “Even as it underscores the importance of whole communities and ecosystems, old growth assures us quietly yet grandiosely that individuals …

Environmental History Worth Reading in April 2015

Every month I choose five environmental history articles/podcasts/videos and other media that I think are worth reading. To see my full list and comments, visit the original post on the Network in Canadian History and Environment’s website. My accompanying video with Sean Kheraj is below: