This is the first in a set of three end-of-year 2021 music stats posts. Going with songs first, followed by top artists, then top albums. I keep track of every track and podcast episode I listen to on all digital platforms, including Itunes, Spotify, and YouTube. by way of Last.fm scrobbling. This is a list of the songs I listened to the most.

*A complete Spotify playlist of my top 50+ songs of the year can be found at the end of the post.*

1. “Somebody” – dezabel (34 Listens)

“8’o clock in the evening
The broken mirror hangs in front of me
And the picture that it’s painting (painting)
I don’t wanna see”


2. “Dullshine” – Loviet (27 Listens)

“I forget the names from all of the signs
On the roads we take on the longest drives
Looking out like I opened my eyes for the first time
You burned me out I never realized”


3. “Brightest Blue” – Ellie Goulding (20 Listens)

“And with these colors fading
People changing feelings
Faking some kind of love”


4. “A Light Through the Clouds” – Vålîçens¡øñ (20 Listens)


5. “Figure 8” – Ellie Goulding (19 Listens)

“I chase your love around a figure 8
I need you more than I can take
You promise forever and a day
And then you take it all away”


6. “Lights” – Ellie Goulding (19 Listens)

“‘Cause they’re calling, calling, calling me home
Calling, calling, calling home
You show the lights that stop me turn to stone
You shine them when I’m alone”


7. “Sundowner” – Daylight In Between (18 Listens)


8. “This Love (Will Be Your Downfall)” – Ellie Goulding (18 Listens)

Who are you to make me feel so good
Who are we to tell ourselves that we’re misunderstood”


9. “Army” – Ellie Goulding (17 Listens)

“I’m a pain, I’m a child, I’m afraid
But yeah, you understand
Yeah, like no one can
I know that we don’t look like much
But no one fucks it up like us”


10. “Love Me Like You Do” – Ellie Goulding

“Touch me like you do, to-to-touch me like you do
What are you waiting for?”


11. “Can’t Feel My Face” – The Weeknd (17 Listens)

“And I know she’ll be the death of me
At least we’ll both be numb”


Published by Jessica M. DeWitt

Dr. Jessica M. DeWitt is an environmental historian of Canada and the United States. She is passionate about the use of digital technologies to bridge the gap between the public and researchers. In addition to her community and professional work, she offers various editing and social media consultancy services.

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