This is the 144th post in my series that explores the most-used words in the top stories shared among Environmental Historians and Environmental Humanities scholars on Twitter each week.

Here are the top articles among environmental historians and humanities scholars this past week (November 25, 2019 – December 1, 2019):

Monday: “Shared Pathogenomic Patterns Characterize a New Phylotype, Revealing Transition toward Host-Adaptation Long before Speciation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis” by Guillaume Sapriel and Roland Brosch, Genome Biology and Evolution


Tuesday: How farmers in New Jersey’s Pinelands grapple with the environmental toll of Thanksgiving cranberries” by Steph Yin, WHYY


Wednesday: “On the Right Side of History, Fridays for Future Belfast” by Sarah Bell, The Eco Eejit


Thursday: ‘History’ made as Norfolk County Council adopts new environmental policy” by Rebekah Chilvers, Lynn News


Friday: Boris melts down over climate debate he couldn’t be bothered with” by John Crace, The Guardian


Saturday: In this climate, how does Boris Johnson not melt with shame?” by Marina Hyde, The Guardian


Sunday: The roots of black Thanksgiving: Why mac and cheese and potato salad are so popular” by Michael Twitty, The Washington Post

Top Words

1. Tuberculosis

2. MTBAP

3. Mycobacterium 

4. species

5. lineage

6. MTB

7. cranberry

8. genomic

9. gene

10. said

 

Published by Jessica M. DeWitt

Dr. Jessica M. DeWitt is an environmental historian of Canada and the United States. She is passionate about the use of digital technologies to bridge the gap between the public and researchers. In addition to her community and professional work, she offers various editing and social media consultancy services.

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